State Minimum Wage Rates Set to Increase

The minimum wage will rise in a number of states in 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the following minimum wage rates (per hour) effective on January 1, 2017:

  • Alaska: $9.80
  • Arizona: $10.00
  • Arkansas: $8.50 for employers with 4 or more employees
  • California: $10.50 for employers with 26 or more employees (for smaller employers, the rate remains $10.00)
  • Colorado: $9.30 ($6.28 for tipped employees)
  • Connecticut: $10.10
  • District of Columbia: $12.50, beginning July 1, 2017 ($3.33 for tipped employees)
  • Florida: $8.10 ($5.08 for tipped employees)
  • Hawaii: $9.25 Maine: $9.00, beginning January 7, 2017
  • Maryland: $9.25, beginning July 1, 2017
  • Massachusetts: $11.00 ($3.75 for tipped employees)
  • Michigan: $8.90 ($3.38 for tipped employees)
  • Missouri: $7.70 ($3.85 for tipped employees)
  • Montana: $8.15 New Jersey: $8.44
  • New York: $9.70, beginning December 31, 2016 ($11.00 for employers in NYC with 11 or more employees; $10.50 for employers in NYC with 10 or fewer employees; $10.00 for Long Island & Westchester; $10.75 for fast food employees outside of NYC; $12.00 for fast food employees within NYC)
  • Ohio: $8.15 ($7.25 for employees at certain smaller companies, and for 14- and 15-year-olds; the wage rises to $4.08 for tipped employees)
  • Oregon: $10.25, beginning July 1, 2017 ($11.25 for employees working within the urban growth boundary of a metropolitan service district; $10.00 in nonurban counties)
  • Rhode Island: $3.89 for tipped employees (for non-tipped employees, the $9.60 minimum wage rate remains unchanged)
  • South Dakota: $8.65 ($4.325 for tipped employees)
  • Vermont: $10.00 ($5.00 for certain service or tipped employees)
  • Washington: $11.00

Be sure to comply with any city or other local wage requirements (which may be higher than the state or federal minimum wage) that may apply to your business. 


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