Economic Burden of ACA

New Executive Order Calls for Minimizing Economic Burden of ACA

President Trump has signed an executive order calling upon federal administrative agencies to minimize the economic burden of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), pending repeal of the law. Until further guidance is issued or legislation is signed, however, all ACA requirements remain in effect, including penalties for noncompliance.

In addition to making clear that the Trump administration seeks the prompt repeal of the ACA, the executive order specifically calls upon agencies to exercise authority and discretion to:

      • Waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation of any ACA provision or requirement that would impose a fiscal or regulatory burden on states, individuals, health care providers, health insurers, and medical device and product producers (including fees, taxes, and penalties);
      • Provide greater flexibility to states, and cooperate with them in implementing health care programs; and
      • Encourage the development of a free and open market for the offering of health care services and health insurance.

The executive order must be implemented in a manner consistent with applicable law, including the Administrative Procedure Act, which requires extended review of and public comment on any federal rules which may be proposed as a result of the executive order.


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